War Memorial from St Stephen the Martyr Avenue Road

now at St Mark's Church, Hamilton Terrace

This First World War memorial was designed and painted by Sigismund Goetze, for the church of St Stephen the Martyr, Avenue Road, which at that time was the parish church of St John’s Wood and whose vicar, John Hamilton Betts, lost two sons in the war.  St Stephen’s was a pretty little Gothic church with a square battlemented tower, built in 1849 and was otherwise known as the Portland Town church. The parish extended to within about fifty yards of the summit of Primrose Hill where three stones stood together where the boroughs of Hampstead, St Pancras and St Marylebone met. The church was damaged so badly in the Second World War that it was taken down and St Johns Wood church became the parish church.

We have tried our best to discover the backgrounds of the men commemorated on this memorial. Please forgive any errors and send us additional or more accurate information that you may have about them.

Frederick Henry Baker 1896 – 1917

William Edward Baker 1898 – 1916

Frederick and William were the sons of Frederick, a house painter, and Ruth Baker. In 1911, they were living at 45 Townshend Cottages and William was still at Barrow Hill School, while Frederick had left school and become an errand boy. Frederick became a bugler in the London Regiment 9th County of London Battalion (Queen Victoria Rifles) and was killed in action on 24 May 1917 in France/Flanders. William was a rifleman and died of wounds on 13 October 1916.

Mack Bartlett 1879 – 1917

In 1891, Mack Bartlett was a schoolboy living at 52 Charles Lane with his father Thomas, a farrier in the Royal Artillery, his mother and brothers Henry and William and 5 sisters. By 1901 he was a builder’s labourer in Marylebone, married to Nellie with two sons and a daughter. He became a private in the Manchester Regiment 19th Battalion and was killed in action on 9 April 1917 in France and was buried in the Pas de Calais Dept.

Arthur George Bateman 1882 – 1917

Arthur Bateman was born in Marylebone, the son of Joseph and Elizabeth and was baptised at St Stephen’s. He became a rifleman of the London Regiment (9th County of London Battalion (Queen Victoria Rifles) and was killed in action in Europe on 14 April 1917.

Henry Lee Betts 1886 – 1917

John Hamilton Betts 1888 – 1916

Henry and John were the sons of John Arthur Betts, the vicar of St Stephen the Martyr in Avenue Road, and in 1901 were living at 1 St Edmunds Terrace with their parents and two sisters. In 1907, the family were all together at 39 Avenue Road but, in 1916, Henry married Elsie Leon at St Mary the Virgin, Primrose Hill, and lived at 87 Fellows Road.

John was a Captain in the Manchester Regiment 12 th Battalion and was killed in action at Albert near the Somme on 7 July 1916 and is buried at Gordon Dump Cemetery, Picardie, France and Henry, a 2nd Lieutenant in Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) 26th Battalion was killed in action at Zillebeke on 20 September 1917 and is buried at Hooge Crater Cemetery.

Frank Bloom  1900 -1918

In 1901, Frank Bloom was living at 31 Cochrane Street with his mother Annie, brother David and sister Mary.  He became a private in the London Regiment (3rd City of London Battalion) Royal Fusiliers, and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 10 September 1918.

Robert James Bloy 1895 – 1917

Robert Bloy was born in St John’s Wood, the son of Robert and Louisa and had five sisters and one brother and attended Barrow Hill School. By 1911 his father was dead and the family lived at 14 Eamont Street and Robert was a packer at a lace merchants.  He became a private in the York and Lancaster Regiment 10th (Service) Battalion and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 21 April 1917.

William Bodman 1887 – 1916

In 1911, William Bodman was living with his wife Mary and two daughters at 24 Barrow Hill Road and was a painter at the Zoological Gardens. He became a private in the Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 6th Battalion and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 18 March 1916.

Henry Rutter Bassett 1876 – 1917

Henry Bassett, a house painter, was the son of Henry, a stoker at the Botanical Gardens, and Mary and, in 1901, was living with his parents and sister and grandmother at 28 New Street. He became a rifleman in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps (17th battalion) and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 30 September  1917 and is buried at Ypres.

Walter Sydney Boley 1885 – 1918

In 191,1 Walter Boley, a pavior’s labourer, lived at 27 Eamont Street with his wife and daughter.  He became a private in the London Regiment 3rd (City of London ) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers) and died in France/Flanders on 30 October 1918. He is buried at St Pol British cemetery, St Pol-sur-Ternoise.

William Edward Braddick  1885 – 1916

In 1911, William Braddick, a plasterer, aged 26, was living at the de Walden Institute in Charlbert Street with his father who was the caretaker, his mother and his sister Annie Rose who was a dressmaker.  He became a private in the Northumberland Fusiliers 1/6th Battalion (Territorial) and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 30 September 1916.

Charles Henry Bunce ? – 1916

Charles Bunce was a stoker first class in the Royal Navy and was serving on HMS Hawke when she was lost in action in the North Sea on 15 October 1916. Hawke was part of the 10 cruiser squadron in blockade duties between Shetland Isles and Norway and then was deployed to the North Sea to stop German warships attacking a troop convoy from Canada. A single torpedo from a German submarine struck Hawke which quickly capsized. A raft carrying one officer and 29 men and a boat load of 49 were all that survived and 524 officers and men died. His body was not recovered but he features in the Chatham Naval Memorial register. He left £133 10s 4d to his widow Ellen, of 42 Park Crescent Mews, Marylebone.

Jack Cameron     

Percy Careswell   ?– 1917

He enlisted in Marylebone as a private in Leicestershire 2/4 Battalion and died of wounds on the home front.

Harold Clapinson  1896 – 1917

In 1911, Harold Clapinson lived with his father Charles, a Post Office sorter, his mother, 2 sisters and a brother at 77 St John’s Wood Terrace.  He had attended Barrow Hill School and then became an office boy.  He enlisted in Herefordshire as a private in the King’s Shropshire Light Infantry 1/4th Battalion and died on 31 October 1917.

Herbert Edward Clinch 1891- 1917

John Fellows Clinch 1897 – 1916

In 1901, Herbert and John lived with their father James, a butcher’s assistant, stepmother Lilian, elder brother and younger sister at 9 New Street and both attended Barrow Hill School. In 1911, Herbert was an invoice clerk and John a junior clerk and there were two younger brothers. John was a lance corporal in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own Middlesex Regiment and was killed on 6 September 1916 in the Persian Gulf.  Herbert was a rifleman in the London Regiment 12th (County of London) battalion (The Rangers) and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 9 April 1917. He is buried in the London Cemetery Neuville-Vitasse.

Henry Coggins  1887 – 1915

Henry Coggins was living in Church Street Marylebone in 1901 with his father Henry, a bootmaker, his mother Kate and a brother and two sisters. He became a private in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) 3rd battalion and was killed in action in France/Flanders on 29 September 1915.

James Cook

Henry Coombs 1896 – 1917

Harry Coombs was a pupil at Barrow Hill School and was  a Lance corporal in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex) Regiment killed in action on 29 September 1917 in France/Flanders aged 21. He was the husband of Ethel (later Ethel Chivers) of 32 Henry Street.

Henry Francis Cooper    ? – 1918

Henry Cooper enlisted in Marylebone and was a rifleman in Rifle Brigade (Prince Consort’s Own) 13th Battalion and was killed in action on 4 November 1918 in France/Flanders and is buried in Dept du Nord Pas de Calais.

Thomas Henry Costello   ? – 1916

Thomas Costello was born in Marylebone and was a private in Hampshire Regiment 10th Battalion and was killed in action on 15 September 1916 in the Balkans and buried in Regional Unit of Serres Central Macedonia, Greece.

­Harry Coulter 1888 – 1920

Harry Coulter was baptised at St Stephen’s and his family were living at 29 Charlbert Street in 1891 when his father Harry was a police constable. By 1901 his mother Charlotte was a widow, employed in doing needlework, and looking after Harry, who attended Barrow Hill School, and his sister Nellie. Ten years later Harry was a clerk at the LCC and Nellie was a clerk at the GPO, and the family were able to employ a housemaid. During the War Harry was a private in the RAMC between 1915 – 1919 and spent 2 years 6 months in France. Presumably as a result of his war service, he died in the Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth in December 1920 and left an estate of £418 12s 10d.

Edwin Philip Culverhouse  1869 – 1916

In 1911, Edwin Culverhouse was a builder’s labourer living at 28 Frederick Street with his wife Caroline, a charwoman, and five sons and a daughter. He enlisted at the age of 46 and was a pioneer in the Corps of Royal Engineers. (At least two of his sons attended Barrow Hill School and also enlisted) He died on 5 February 1916 in France/Flanders.

Ernest Andrew Dallenger  1887 – 1914

In 1894, Ernest Dallenger was at Netherwood School in Camden Town and, in 1911, aged 16 he was a printer’s apprentice living with his widowed mother, a charwoman,and his sister Lily, a daily girl, in two rooms in Hampstead. He became a private in the Household Cavalry Corps of Hussars 3rd (King’s Own Hussars) and was killed in action on 20 November 1914 in France/Flanders and buried at Ypres.

George William Day ? – 1917

George Day was born and lived in Marylebone and was a private in the London Regiment 3rd (City of London) Battalion Royal Fusiliers and was killed in action 28 August 1918 in France /Flanders.

William Richard Deal  ? – 1918

William Deal was A/Lance Corporal in the Corps of Royal Engineers and was killed in action on 25 March 1918 in France/Flanders.

William Samuel Dicker ? – 1916

William Dicker was a private in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) 13th battalion and died of wounds on 20 July 1916 in France/Flanders. He is buried in Departement de la Somme, Picardie, France

William Victor Digweed  1897 – 1919

William Digweed lived with his parents Joshua and Annie and three brothers and a sister in 17 Townshend Cottages and was an errand boy in 1897. He became a private in the Royal Fusiliers and died in Norfolk in 1919. His father served in the RASC and was discharged on 8 April 1919.

Frank Arthur Dore  ? – 1917

Frank Dore was a private in the 15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales Own )Civil Service Rifles, which was a regiment of civil servants and their friends, and was killed in action on 1 December 1917 in France/Flanders.  He is buried at Zonnebeke, West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium. There is a war memorial to the regiment at Somerset House, London. PHOTO

William George Arthur Eatwell DCM 1898 – 1918

William Eatwell was brought up in St Johns Wood and attended Barrow Hill School. His parents were William and Ellen of 3 Townshend Road.  He was a lance corporal in South Staffordshire Regiment 2/6th (T.F.) Battalion and was killed in action on 21 March 1918 in France/Flanders. He was awarded the DCM “for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while acting a runner.  He succeeded in taking messages to and from the line through heavy enemy barrages and thus kept up communication with the companies under very grave difficulties.  His work was excellent”. His name is on the Arras Memorial at Faubourg-D’Amiens Cemetery Arras.

Joseph Fitzgerald ? – 1917

Joseph Fitzgerald was born and enlisted in Marylebone. He was a driver in the Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery and died on 2 November 1917 at Salonika in the Balkans.

Edward Wareham Fowler 1891 – 1916

Edward Fowler was the son of a retired licensed victualler and lived with his family and three live-in servants at 47 Avenue Road. He was employed as a clerk at an envelope manufacturer’s in Stockport and lodged at Maple in that area. He was a member of a training corps before the war and applied for a commission in December 1914., becoming a Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiments 7th Battalion (Territorial). He was involved in the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916 and was killed in action on 15 July 1916 when he was mown down by gunfire as his battalion left the trenches. His body was never recovered and he is commemorated at Thiepval and also on the war memorial at Maple with his friends there. He left £1530 14s 9d and also Life insurance of £1052 which was bequeathed to his fiancée.

Colin Blomfield Frost 1889 – 1918

Colin Blomfield went to Merchant Taylor’s school and then worked in China from 1912 – 1915, when he returned to volunteer and was Lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery, serving in Flanders, Egypt and Palestine.  He was killed in action on 24 July 1918 in France at St Venant and buried in the British cemetery there.  He left £1,400 to his father, Edward, of 1 Bentinck Terrace.

Alex Fuller  1881 – 1918

Alex Fuller was married to Annie Maria Fuller of 76 Cochrane Street and was a private in the Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment) 9th battalion.  He was killed in action on 8 September 1918 in France/Flanders and is commemorated on the memorial in Vis-en-Artois.

William Henry Gallop ? – 1916

William Gallop was a private in the Lancashire Fusiliers and was killed in 1916. He is buried in Nord-Pas-de Calais.

William Geere  1894 – 1916

In 1911,William Geere was a clerk living at 11 Eamont Street with his parents Charles and Agnes, 3 brothers and a sister.  He became a private in the Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 8th Battalion and was killed in action on 19 March 1916 in France/Flanders.

Richard Bowie Gaskell Glover 1887 – 1915

Richard Glover was the son of Richard Glover, a gas meter manufacturer, and was educated at Uppingham School and became a gas engineer.  He was a captain in the Army in 1907 and in 1914-15 served in Malta, then went to France as Captain in the London Regiment 1st (City of London) Battalion Royal Fusiliers. He was killed in action on 5 November 1915 while superintending the building of new trenches and is buried at Sailly sur la Lys. He left £2166.

Albert Goldswain 1884– 1918

Albert Goldswain was a professional soldier; in the  1911 census he was in South Africa and in the war he was an A/Sergeant in the King’s Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) 2nd Battalion and died on 9 October 1918 at Baghdad.

Percy Edward Goodwin 1889 – 1917

In 1911, Percy Goodwin was a footman at 49 Cadogan Square and son of Charles and Selina. He became a rifleman in the London Regiment 16th (County of London) Battalion and died of wounds on 9 November 1917 in Israel and is buried in Beersheba War Cemetery. He left £146 6s 8d to his father.

Charles James Howard Hall 1893 – 1916.

In 1911, Charles Hall, a telegraphist messenger, was living at 32 Park Road Upper Baker Street with his parents. He was a rifleman with the London Regiment 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria Rifles) and died of wounds on 2 July 1916 in France/Flanders and is buried at Couin British and Commonwealth Cemetery.

Frederick William Head  ?-1918

Frederick Head’s parents lived in St John’s Wood  at 4 Tuckers Place and he had attended Barrow Hill school. He became a rifleman with the Kings Royal Rifle Corps 7th Battalion and was killed in action on 4 April 1918. He is commemorated at the Pozieres memorial

Frederick Langford Hedgecock ? – 1917

Frederick Hedgecock was a butcher’s assistant and was a rifleman in the King’s Royal Rifle Corps 18th Battalion and was killed in action on 25 July 1917 in France/Flanders. He left £87 4s 6d.

William David Herald 1881 – 1916

William Herbert George Herald 1899 – 1917

In 1911, the family lived at 12 Charlbert Street where William was a printer’s labourer  married to Margaret, with children Edith,(13), William Herbert (12), who was attending Barrow Hill School as his father had before him,  Lilian (10) Elizabeth (6) Charles (3) and Alice (1).

William became a private in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex regiment) 2nd Battalion and died of wounds on 25 August 1916 in Flanders and is buried at Heilly Station Cemetery Mericourt L’Abbe.

William Herbert became a private in the Bedfordshire Regiment 6th Battalion and was killed in action on 9 October 1917 in Flanders.

Heber Higgs 1885-1917

Allen Edward Higgs 1895

In 1911 Heber Higgs was a house painter and his brother Allen was an errand boy and they had both attended Barrow Hill School and lived at 51 St John’s Wood terrace with their parents Heber and Harriet and 3 sisters and 2 brothers. Heber must have later emigrated to Canada and married Emma Elizabeth  of Ontario as he returned a corporal in the1st Battalion Canadian Railway Troops and died on 4 November 1917.  Allen was in the Queens Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) 8th Battalion and was killed in action on 26 September 1915 in France/Flanders.

Sidney Herbert Hill 1899-1918

Sidney Hill lived at 25 Eamont Street in 1911 with his parents, 3 sisters and a baby brother. He became a private in the Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line (including Yeomanry and Imperial Camel Corps) 15th (The King’s) Hussars. He was killed in action on 10 November 1918 in France/Flanders.

William Holmes ? – 1917

William Holmes lived in St John’s Wood and was a gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery 94th siege battery and was killed in action on 20 February 1917 in France/Flanders,

George Huckle 1890-1917

George Huckle was a Lance Corporal in 1st/3rd Battalion, London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers)  and died on 16 August 1917 in France/Flanders and is commemorated on the Pozieres memorial.

Arthur Jakeman 1897 -1917

In 1911, Arthur Jakeman lived with his family in 10 Townshend Cottages and attended Barrow Hill School. He became a private in the London Regiment 23rd (County of London) Battalion and was killed in action on 7 June 1917 in France/Flanders and is buried at Ypres.

Alfred Johnson 

Alfred Jordan

Alfred Jordan was a private in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment) 21st Battalion and was killed in action on 23 March 1918 in France/Flanders.

Francis Joseph Kinnaird 1876 – 1915

In 1901, Francis Kinnaird was an artist, the son of a sculptor and brother of Henry, a noted landscape painter. In 1911 he married Gertrude, widow of an M.P.  In 1909 he had joined the Staffordshire Militia and in March 1915 went to France. He was wounded in May 1915 and brought back to London where he died in Sister Agnes’ hospital on 6 June 1915. In his will he left £584 to his widow who was living at 16 Titchfield Terrace.

James Lacey 1876- 1917?

In 1911, James Lacey, a baker, was living at 22 Eamont Street with his four sisters.  He enlisted in the Middlesex Regiment in 1914.

Walter Lane

Alfred Lardner 1885-1916

Alfred Lardner was born in Marylebone in 1885 and in 1890 was at the Central national School in Marylebone. By 1911 he had joined the 2nd battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) and was killed in action on 21 August 1916 in France/Flanders and is commemorated at Thiepval.

Alfred Lavender ?-1917

Alfred Lavender was a private in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry 2/1st Bucks Battalion and was killed in action on 22 August 1917 in France Flanders

William Arthur Lee

Thomas Charles Levoir  1887 – 1915

Thomas Levoir in 1911 was a carman to a grocer’s store and was living at 52 St John’s Wood Terrace with Annie Mulcahy; ( the census taker had noted unusually “not yet married”)  .He became a Lance Corporal in the London Regiment 12th (County of London) Battalion the Rangers and was killed in action 1 July 1916.

William Thomas Little 1893 – 1914

William Little lived in 1911 at 7 Ryders Terrace with his parents and brother and was a grocer’s porter. He became a gunner in the Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery and died at sea on 30 August 1914.

Henry James Luff 1893 – 1917

James Alfred Luff 1898 -1917

In 1901, Henry aged 8 was living with his parents, Henry ( a housepainter) and Lilly and sister Lilly aged 4 and brother George aged 1 in Upper William Street.

He joined the Royal Navy and was a leading stoker on HMS Mary Rose, a M-class destroyer. Mary Rose and Strongbow were escorting a convoy of 12 merchant ships from Norway and were 70 miles east of Lerwick at dawn on 17 October 1917 when two German cruisers approached at high speed and opened fire.  Strongbow was sunk and Mary Rose received a hit in the engine room; the Captain ordered the master gunner to scuttle the ship and as the lifeboats had been reduced to matchwood only a handful of men who clung to a raft were saved several hours later. The Germans sank 9 of the merchant ships. Harry’s next of kin, his aunt Annie Luff of 31 Upper William Street, was informed that Harry was killed “as a direct result of enemy action protecting a convoy”. He and his cousin John had both attended Barrow Hill School. Annie’s son John, named after his father, had been baptised at St Stephen’s in 1898 and was an ordinary seaman on HMS Bat. On 29 October 1917, a few days after Harry’s death, Annie was notified that he had accidentally drowned.

Edward John Macmillan 

Alfred Sydney Maidment 1891 – 1916

Arthur John Maidment 1899-1918

In 1911, brothers Alfred and Arthur Maidment were living at 21 Wharncliffe Gardens, with their mother and sister Emily. Arthur was at school and Alfred was a clerk. Alfred became a corporal in the London Regiment 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victorias Rifles) and was killed in action on 1 July 1916 in France/Flanders and  Arthur joined the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment) as a private and was killed in action on 24 April 1918 in France/Flanders.

(Thomas) George Mann ?-1918

George Mann lived in St John’s Wood and was a regular soldier, a private in the Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line (including Yeomanry and Imperial Camel Corps)  and Ist Kings Dragoon Guards. He was in India when the regiment sailed to France in 1914 and returned to India in 1917.  He died in India on 4 November 1918

 Harry Albert Mann  1895- 1918

Born in St John’s Wood, in 1911 at the age of 16, Harry Albert was at the Royal Military School of music at Kneller Hall and his military unit was the Shropshire Light Infantry.  He was later a Corporal in the King’s (Shropshire Light Infantry) 1st Battalion and was killed in action on 21 March 1918 in France /Flanders and is commemorated at the Arras memorial.

George Sidney Mansfield 1894-1915

George Mansfield was living at 61 Henry Street in 1901 with his father Thomas (a boot leather seller), his mother Caroline and three brothers. In 1911 his brother Herbert was a postman with the GPO and George Sidney was a telegraph messenger. He became a  rifleman in the 8th City of London (Post Office Rifles)and died on 14 July 1915.

George Marsden

Cuthbert Syndale Marshall 1892-1917

Cuthbert Marshall lived at 2 Harley Road in 1911, the son of Charles Marshall, an artist, and was an articled clerk to a chartered accountant.  He became a private with the Queens (Royal West Surrey Regiment) 6th battalion and was killed in action on 20 November 1917 in France/Flanders and is buried in the Departement du Nord, Nord Pas de Calais.

 

Ernest Edward Milton 1884-1917

George Milton 1887 – 1916

Ernest and George Milton were brothers living at 23 Sussex Place, Regents Park in 1911 with their parents Matthew and Jessie and 7 other siblings. George became a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery and the Royal Field Artillery and was killed in action on 25 October 1916. Ernest became a lieutenant in the Royal Garrison Artillery and was killed in action on 23 January 1917 and is buried in the Dept de la Somme Picardie. Ernest left £123 18s 11d to his father and George left his father £127 5s 8d. By then, Matthew and Jessie were living at 90 Clifton Hill.

Alfred Ernest Mitchinson 1883-1918

Alfred Mitchinson was at the Central National School in Marylebone when he was 5. He married Jeannie Girvan in 1909 in Marylebone and in 1913 was living at 3 New Street. He was a rifleman in the London Regiment 18th (County of London) Battalion (London Irish rifles) and died of wounds on 15 May 1918 in Egypt.

John Evan Moody  1894-1918

William Moody 1899 -1918

In 1911, brothers John and William Moody were living at 68 Cochrane Street with their elder brother George, a motor works fitter, and their widowed mother who was supported by them. George and John, who was an errand boy to a printer, had attended Barrow Hill School and William was still at Barrow Hill.  John became a driver with the Royal Horse Artillery and died on 4 July 1918 and William became a private in the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) and died of wounds on 3 November 1918.George also enlisted but survived.

Edward Percival Morgan 1888 – 1918

Edward Morgan was born at Fiesole in Italy in 1888 and was a pupil at Bedales School, Petersfield from 1899 – 1905, then attended the S.E.Agricultural college in Wye before farming in Sussex and then moving to Canada. He joined up in 137th Bn (C.Coy) Canadians and transferred to the Royal Flying Corps 206th Squadron as a Lieutenant. The Bedales school magazine of 1917 states “after completing his training he was sent out to France in April 1918 and on May 22 had just returned from his first bombing raid when a nose spin brought him down on the aerodrome, and he died next day without regaining consciousness.  He is buried at Longuenesse (St Omer) Souvenir Cemetery.  His London probate record shows he left £312 8s 6d to his father, Edward Strachan Morgan of independent means, who lived at 56 Boundary Road NW8.(with thanks to Bedales School for information).

Charles Humphrey Newton-Deakin1893 – 1917

In 1911, Charles Newton-Deakin was an army student living at 6 Avenue Road with his father Charles, a barrister, his mother Alice and sister Frederica and 3 servants. He obtained a Commission in the 3rd Dragoon Guards in January 1913 and sailed for Egypt remaining there until his squadron returned to England on the outbreak of war. He went to France in October 1914 and fought at the two Battles of Ypres and Battle of Loos, until killed by shell fire at Monchy on 11 April 1917, when he was one of only three left who had come back from Egypt. Colonel Burt wrote to his father “Your son was beloved by all ranks in the Regiment and his loss is very deeply felt.”  He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial in Faubourg d’Amiens cemetery, Arras.

William Nicholls 

John Henry Owen

Francesco  Pautassi

In 1914, Fancesco Pautassi married Lily Peck in Kensington.

Frederick David Pegram 1892 – 1916

Frederick Pegram was the son of David and May Pegram of 78 Cochrane Street. He was a sergeant in the Royal Munster Fusiliers and was killed in action on 9 September 1916 in France/Flanders

Samuel Leslie Petrie 1892- 1917

Samuel Petrie was born in 1892 and married Ethel Scott at Holy Trinity Marylebone on 2 May 1915. He was a private in the Northumberland Fusiliers 8th Battalion and died on 13 October 1917, and is buried in East Finchley crematorium.

William James Henry Phelps 1890 -1915

Alfred Ravenhill Phelps 1892 -1915

In the 1901 census William and Alfred were living at 58 Cochrane Street with their father John, a motor lamp cleaner, and mother Clara, and attending Barrow Hill School.  In1911 they lived in Barrow Hill Road. Alfred , then a porter, married Louise Davie at St Stephen’s church Avenue Road on 16 December 1914  and became a drummer in the Norfolk regiment and was killed in action on 13 October 1915in France/Flanders and is buried at Nord pas du Calais. William became a private in the Queens Own Royal W Kent Regiment and was killed in action on 14 October 1915 in France/Flanders.

Albert Purnell

Albert Quantrill ?-1915

Albert Quantrill was born in Hampstead and was a Lance Corporal in the King’s Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) 2nd Battalion and was killed in action on 7 May 1915 in France/Flanders and is buried at Ypres.

Ernest William Quantrill    ?-1917

Ernest Quantrill was a private in the Lincolnshire Regiment 7th Battalion and was killed in action on 28 May 1917 in France/ Flanders and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial Faubourg d’Amiens cemetery.

William Read

Albert Edward Reeve —1915

Albert Reeve was a private in the Essex Regiment 1st Battalion and died at sea on 13 August 1915

Frank Lionel Reeve 1889 -1918

Charles Cecil Reeve 1893 – 1914

Frank  and Charles Reeve were born in 1889 in St John’s Wood to Joseph ( a police constable) and Jessi, and both were baptised at St Stephen’s. In 1901, the family of five sons and three daughters were living at 21 Ordnance Road. Frank married Mary Ann in 1909 and must have emigrated to Canada as he returned as a private in Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians) and had Canadian nationality. He died on 30 March 1918 and is commemorated in France.

Charles Reeve became a private in the London Regiment 3rd (City of London) battalion (Royal Fusiliers) and died at home on 23 August 1914.

Arthur Renton 1899 – 1918

In 1911, Arthur Renton was living with his widowed mother Elizabeth, a monthly nurse, and 2 older brothers and a sister at 44 Frederick Street and he attended Barrow Hill School. He became a rifleman in the London Regiment 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queens Westminster Rifles) and died of wounds on 4 April 1918 in France/Flanders.s.

Arthur John Riley 1899 – 1918

Arthur Riley was the son of Mrs A F Riley of 20 Henry Street. He was a private in the leiscestershire Regiment 8th Battalion and died on 14 Ocotber 1918 in France/Flanders

Leslie Barry Roberts  ?-1918

Leslie Roberts was a 2nd Lieutenant in the East Surrey Regiment 11th Battalion and was killed in action 24 August 1918

Arthur Henry Rogers  1867 – 1915

Arthur Rogers was the husband of Mary Ann Rogers of 39 Frederick Street.  He had served in India prior to the War when he was a rifleman with the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own) 2nd Battalion and was killed in action on 2 September 1915 in France/Flanders

Charles John Rogers  1881 – 1915

In 1911 Charles  Rogers was living at 28 Townshend Cottages with his wife Susanna and two baby boys. He was a general labourer.

Henry Thomas Rumble 1897 – 1918

In 1911, Henry Rumble was living at 5 Henry Place with his parents, four sisters and four brothers and he was an errand boy. He became a DVR in the Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery and was killed in action on 21 March 1918 and is buried at Temple le Guerard extension.

Francis Sage 1897- 1916

In 1911 Frank Sage lived with his parents, James, a general labourer, and Ada, and 4 sisters and 3 brothers at 1 Eamont Place. He had attended Barrow Hill School. He became a private in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry 7th Battalion and was killed in action on 16 September 1916 in France/Flanders.

Alfred Sangster   ?-1918

George Sangster ?- 1915

Alfred and George Sangster were living at 2 Eamont Place in 1911 and were both regular soldiers.  George had been baptised at St Stephen’s. He was a private in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) 2nd Battalion and was killed in action on 25 April 1915 at Gallipoli and commemorated on the Helles memorial at Gallipoli. Alfred was a Lance Corporal in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment 2nd Battalion and was killed in action on 1 July 1916 and commemorated on the Thiepval memorial.

William George Sar

Arthur Saunders   1894-1916

In 1911, Arthur Saunders was living at 54 Cochrane Street with his father Charles, (a house painter), and mother Mary, (a washerwoman), and three sisters and two brothers. He attended Barrow Hill School and then became an errand boy. He became a private in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment) 13th Battalion and died of wounds on 15 March 1916 in Flanders and is buried at Poperinghe.

Walter Sangster Simmonds 1881-1916

Walter Simmonds was born in 1881 in Orpington and in 1901 was a resident Assistant Master at Cranborne College. On 8 May 1915 he married Alice Haines at St Stephen’s and on 14 November 1915 went to France. In 1916 he was a 2nd Lieutenant with the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own) 10th Battalion and his address was 2 Hanover House. He was killed in action in France on 7 October 1916 and is buried in the Dept de la Seine Picardie . He left £468 11s 9d

Arthur William Slack 1893 – 1917

Arthur Slack was baptised at St Stephen’s in 1893, the son of Richard (a builder and employer) and Sarah and  in 1911 they were  living at 25 Charlbert Street and Arthur was an apprentice to the building trade. He  became a private in the Northumberland Fusiliers 1/5th Battalion (Territorial) and died on 26 October 1917 in France/Flanders.

Edward Slater  1880-1916?

Edward Slater was the son of John Slater(a fishmonger) of 69 Henry Street,  and in 1891 Edward was at Barrow Hill School. He became a clerk but enlisted in the Seaforth Highlanders in 1898.

Richard Smallman 1888 – 1914

In 1901, Richard Smallman was living  in 4 St James Mews in St Stephen’s parish with his father John, a shoemaker’s assistant, and mother Maria and two sisters. In the 1911 census he is a soldier at Aldershot.  He was a corporal in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London) Regiment 4th battalion and died on 14 September 1914 in France/Flanders.

George Spencer 

Henry Charles Spinner  1882?-1918

Henry Spinner although born in Suffolk was christened in 1882 at St Stephen’s as his father was working as a gardener in Avenue Road. In 1891 the family were living at 69 St Johns Wood Terrace and he enlisted as a rifleman in the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own)2/10th London regiment In 1916.  He was killed in action on 7 September 1918 in France /Flanders.

Thomas William Staggs 1886-1916

Thomas Staggs , a coal porter, was living with his father and brother at 34 Frederick Street in 1911. He became a private in the Norfolk Regiment 7th Battalion and was killed in action on 12 October 1916 in France/Flanders and is commemorated at Thiepval.

William Stapleton 1895 – 1916

In 1911 William Stapleton, a labourer, was living at 4 Frederick Street with his father Harry, a night watchman, his mother Mary Ann and sister Mary who was a milliner. He became a private in the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) and was killed in action on 18 August 1916 in France/Flanders and is commemorated at Thiepval.

Harold John Steele 1895- 1917

Harold Steele was the son of Edward and Rose Steele of 43 Townshend Road and had attended Barrow Hill School. He became a sergeant in the London Regiment 15th (County of London) Battalion (PWO Civil Service Rifles) and was killed in action on 7 June 1917 in France/Flanders. He was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and attention to duty.

Frederick Richard Swain 1882-1916

Frederick Swain in 1901 was a grocer’s porter and in August 1911,  when he was a shop assistant, he married Harriet Higgs, the daughter of Heber Higgs  and sister of Heber and Allen Higgs (see above. ) He became a Lance Corporal in the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) 24th Battalion and was killed in action on 13 November 1913 in France/Flanders and is commemorated at Thiepval.

James Henry Taylor ?-1917

James Turner was born in Marylebone but lived in Carrickfergus. He was a sergeant in the Royal Irish Rifles 2nd Battalion and was killed in action on 7 August 1917 and buried at Ypres.

Clive Halliburton Thorpe  1886-1918

Clive Thorpe lived in Tunbridge Wells where his father Harry was a coach builder and in 1911 he was a coach builder manager. He was C.Q.M.S in the Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 10th Battalion and was killed in action on 8 November 1918 in France/Flanders. He was mentioned in despatches and left £1721 9s 5d.

George Turner

Sidney Turner

Charles James Usher 1883- 1916

In 1911, Charles Usher was living at 64 St John’s Wood Terrace with his parents and sister and was a clerk in the civil service. He became a private in the London Regiment 15th (County of London) Battalion (PWO Civil Service Rifles) and was killed in action on 15 September 1916 in France /Flanders.

Edward Ernest  Vaile 1892 – 1915

Philip Amyas Vaile 1895 -1916

Edward and Philip Vaile lived at 10 Ormonde Terrace with their parents, sister and three servants. Edward had belonged to the Honourable Artillery Co and then was a 2nd Lieutenant in the Worcestershire Regiment 3rd Battalion. He was killed in action on 5 October 1915 in Belgium.  He left £527 10s 9d to his father. Philip also was in the 1st Battalion Hon Artillery Co and then was a 2nd Lieutenant in the 19th (County of London ) Battalion  and died of wounds on 14 October 1916 when he was accidentally killed by the premature explosion of bombs while instructing Canadians at the Central School in Le Havre. He is buried at the St Marie cemetery in Le Havre.

James Henry Walker 

George Baynard Wallace  ? – 1916

George Wallace was born in 1881 at 23 New Street to Baynard and Emily and was baptised at St Stephen’s. In 1911 he was a baker and on 4 January 1914 he married Emily Pile at St Stephens and enlisted in 1915 when he was living at 61 St John’s Wood Terrace, joining the Service Battalion, Rifle Brigade. He was killed in action on 28 September 1916 in France/Flanders.

George Henry Warren  1882 – 1918

George Warren was the son of Walter and Sarah and married Maud Shorter in 1910 at St Stephen’s and lived at 9 New Street. He was a rifleman with the London Regiment 12th (County of London) Battalion (The Rangers) and was killed in action on 24 April 1918 in Belgium and is buried in Hangard Communal Cemetery.

Stafford Frank Watson  1892 -1916

Stafford Watson was an articled clerk to a chartered accountant in 1911, living in Hornsey with his mother and sister. He became a Lance corporal in the London Regiment 16th (County of London) Battalion (Queens Westminster Rifles) and died of wounds on 15 August 1916 in hospital in Oxford and bequeathed £913 8s 9d to his widow Mary.  He was awarded the Military Medal.

John Watkins  ? -1918

John Watkins was the stepson of James and Esther Robinson of 12 Townshend Cottages and was a rifleman in the London Regiment 9th (County of London) Battalion  (Queen Victorias Rifles) and died of wounds on 24 August 1918 in France /Flanders.

Charles Wedge  1890 – 1915

William Robert Wheal  1888 – 1918

William Wheal was the son of William, (a bootmaker), and Elizabeth and in 1901 they were living at 76 St John’s Wood High Street. He married Kate Salmon at St Stephen’s in 1912 when he was a boot salesman  and they lived at 4 Circus Road, having a son Robert in 1915.  William became a Royal Naval Air Service Air Mechanic 2nd class and died 26 May 1918 in Hendon and was buried in Hampstead. He left £404.

Robert Wheeler  poss 1887-1917

Robert Wheeler was the husband of Ethel Wheeler of 62 Henry Street. He was a rifleman in the London Regiment 12th (County of London) Battalion (The Rangers) and was killed in action on 8 September 1917.

Frederick Stoddart Whinney  1886 – 1919

Frederick Whinney was born at 22 St Edmunds Terrace and baptised at St Stephen’s. His father  Frederick was a barrister and he had 5 siblings and they later lived at 66 Avenue Road. By 1911 he was in the army and he was a Captain in the Lincolnshire Regiment.  He died in Cologne after the war on 17 March 1919  where he was attached to staff as a brigade major and is buried there. He was awarded the M.C. and the Croix de Guerre, and he left £1210 11s 6d .

Walter Edward White ? – 1917

Walter White was born in 1891 at 31 St Johns Wood Terace; his father Robert was a clerk and he had two brothers and a sister. By 1901 his mother Clara was a widow and they lived at 39 Eamont Street. He was a private in the Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 8th battalion and died of wounds on 28 March 1917 in France/Flanders.

William Winsby 1888 – 1916

William Winsby was born in Maida Vale in 1888; his father George was a house painter and he had 9 siblings. In 1904 he was a van guard and in 1906 he enlisted in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own ( Middlesex Regiment) 11th battalion. He was killed in action on 5 October 1916 in France/Flanders.

Charles Wood  ? – 1914

Charles Wood was born in Marylebone but lived in Somerset.  He was a private in the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) 2nd battalion and was killed in action on 21 October 1914 in France/Flanders

James Edward Wright 1866 – 1918

James Wright was born in Stockport and was the son of John and Hannah Wright and the husband of Eliza Wright of 9 Barrow Hill Road. He was a sergeant major in the 3rd County of London Yeomanry (sharpshooters) and died on 20 January 1918.

Malcolm Joseph Wright ? – 1918

Malcolm Wright lived in St John’s Wood and was a rifleman in the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own) 2/10th London Regiment and was killed in action on 21 September 1918 and is commemorated on the memorial at Vis en Artois.

 

Dead Man’s Penny

This was a memorial plaque issued after the War to the next of kin of all those killed, regardless of rank, up to 1922.  Made of bronze, it shows Britannia holding a trident and standing with a lion, and bestowing a laurel crown on a rectangular tablet bearing the name of the deceased.  Two dolphins represent the Navy and a second lion is tearing apart the German eagle. The inscription round the edge reads He died for freedom and honour. It was designed by Edward Carter Preston and was made in an extremely difficult casting process Plaques were issued to over 1,355,000 next of kin of males and 6000 females.

1914 – 1915 Victory Star

Victory Medal

This was awarded to all who had been mobilised, fighting, serving in military operations, or at sea  between midnight 4/5 August 1914 and midnight 11/12 November 1918.

British War Medal

This medal was automatically awarded in the event of death on active service.

 

 

This page was added on 04/07/2014.

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